『精神病理の形而上学』日本語版への序文

★★★★

Preface to A Metaphysics of Psychopathology   日本語訳はこちらから

With great caution, I commence this preface to the Japanese translation of A Metaphysics of Psychopathology.  In an interdisciplinary field such as the philosophy of psychiatry, an important goal is for one’s work to be relevant to both philosophers and psychiatrists/psychologists. It takes extensive reading and re-reading, and writing and re-writing to cross disciplinary barriers. I have had some success in that respect, but whether what I have written in this book can successfully cross a linguistic and cultural barrier is something I am unprepared to anticipate with any clarity.

For the past twenty-five years, I have advocated for a pragmatist perspective on psychiatric classification. Pragmatism is a theory about the meaning of words such as ‘truth.’ The pragmatist perspective on truth emphasizes its basis in our attempt actively engage the world, to adapt to the world and to change it.  With respect to classification, pragmatism emphasizes how our purposes and goals for classifying are important factors in evaluating the degree to which a classification is successful.

Pragmatism is normally associated with American philosophy, but in my case it is American and British philosophy.  It is less evident in this book, but I look back to the English empiricist John Locke as nearly as much as I do to the American pragmatist William James.

The philosophy of pragmatism was introduced in the late 19th century by a small group mostly American intellectuals with empiricist inclinations. Empiricism is associated with the British philosophers John Locke, David Hume, and John Stuart Mill. Empiricists are suspicious of abstract philosophical concepts such as ‘essence’ and ‘substrate’ because they readily become empty words about mostly other words.  Empiricists prefer to connect abstractions to the data of experience.  The thinkers who introduced pragmatism accepted Darwin’s theory of evolution by means of natural selection soon after it was published in 1879.  Pragmatism is what these thinkers’ empiricism evolved into in the wake of Darwin’s theories.  For pragmatists, abstract concepts should be evaluated with respect to the contribution that they make to our attempts to engage with the world.

There has been considerable westernization across the planet in the past seventy years, but I doubt that a three hundred year old philosophy (empiricism/pragmatism) can reach as deep as what is laid down by thousands of years of tradition. In short, I am pleased and humbled that this translation has been produced, but am curious to learn what readers of this translation will make of it. I hope that they will charitably tolerate its limits.

I will mention one feature of the book that might help it survive the transition across the linguistic and cultural barrier, and that is what the book attempts to be about.  To explain what the book is about, in part, let me contrast what I call the imperfect community model with Jerome Wakefield’s harmful dysfunction model.

According to Wakefield, a mental disorder involves a breakdown in our normal, naturally selected psychological functioning. This breakdown has the additional feature of being harmful to its bearer. Wakefield’s model is as good as any model at articulating what most people mean or even should mean by the concept of mental disorder. But Wakefield’s model was also constructed as a response to a particular problem – how to demarcate real mental disorders from (sometimes) harmful psychological conditions that are not mental disorders.  Wakefield took his conceptual solution to the demarcation problem and generalized it into a theory of mental disorder as a whole.

I approach the nature of mental disorders differently. Rather than assuming that behind the appearances the world comes preferentially organized into categories such as physical disorder and mental disorder, disease and health, and normality and abnormality, I start with the experience of ‘what is there.’ What we find ‘there’ is that that the distinction between health and disease and normal abnormal are mostly clear when we consider the extremes, but distinctions made on the basis of the extremes are inadequate for many purposes.

In later work, I have compared this situation to the paradox of the heap in philosophy.  Let me explain. There is a clear distinction between sand scatted on the floor and a heap of sand. But if we begin with sand scattered on the floor and add one grain of sand at a time, there is no point at which adding one more grain of sand will transform the scattered sand into a heap.  There are borderline regions where the distinction between scattered sand and a heap cannot be precisely made. In some cases, this is also true for the distinction between normal and abnormal in psychiatry.  The distinction cannot be perfectly made.

Many of us desire answers that transcend the complications of experience and allow us to decide with clarity whether things like hysteria, narcissistic personality, and bereavement-related depression are really disorders or not. However, we would either be fooling ourselves or fooling others if we forced quasi-precise distinctions on to what is inherently imprecise.  Just as what we consider to be an adult can vary depending on our purposes for classifying (e.g., to allow drinking alcohol versus voting versus leaving school), what we consider to be a psychiatric disorder can vary – but such variation does not mean that disorders are just made up or that we can decide things any way we want.

Another thing we see ‘there’ is that the domain of psychiatric disorders is a motley collection of different conditions that are alike in some ways and different in other ways, but there is no way in which they are all alike.   It is an imperfect collection that came together not because of the discovery of an inner nature shared by all psychiatric disorders, but because the variety of conditions included in the psychiatric domain were appropriate to the skill set of psychiatrists and psychologists.

I do not argue that these complications mean that mental health professionals should no longer group symptoms clusters into coherent kinds. Abstract kind concepts can be very practical things, but we should understand that it is in the nature of abstract concepts to be inadequate when confronted with the many particulars of clinical reality.

If this notion of ‘what is there’ is reasonably valid, I have some hope that a part of what I have written can survive the transition across the linguistic and cultural barrier.

Peter Zachar
May 20, 2018

 

★★★★


『精神病理の形而上学』日本語版への序文 原文はこちらから

  私は細心の注意をもって、この日本語版への序文に取りかかっています。精神医学の哲学という学際領域において私たちが目指していることの一つは、哲学者および精神医学者/心理学者の双方にとって意味のある仕事をすることです。徹底的な読解に次ぐ読解、著述に次ぐ著述が、分野間の壁を乗り越えるためには必要です。この点において私はいくばくかの成功をおさめてきました。しかし本書で述べたことが言語と文化の壁をうまく越えられるものであるかどうかについては、できるという見込みをはっきり述べる自信はありません。

 この二十五年間、私は精神医学における分類についてのプラグマティズム的な見方を提唱してきました。プラグマティズムとは「真理」のような言葉の意味に関する学説です。プラグマティズム的な見方では、世界に活動的に交わり、応答し、世界を変えてゆく試みのなかにあるものを重視し、それに基づいて真理の意味を考えます。分類に関していえば、プラグマティズムが重視するのは、私たちが何のために、何をめざして分類を行うのかということであり、それこそが分類がどれだけうまくいっているかを評価するための重要な要素なのです。

 プラグマティズムはアメリカの哲学と通常は結びつけられますが、アメリカのみならずイギリスの哲学とも結びつくものだと私は考えています。本書ではあまり明確ではありませんが、私はアメリカのプラグマティズムの思想家ウィリアム・ジェイムズと同じくらい、イギリスの経験論者ジョン・ロックの思想も参照しています。

 プラグマティズムの哲学は十九世紀の後半に、もっぱらアメリカの知識人からなる小集団によって提示されたものですが、彼らには経験論的な傾向がありました。経験論はイギリスの哲学者であるジョン・ロックやデイヴィッド・ヒューム、ジョン・スチュアート・ミルに結びつけられる思想です。経験論者は抽象的な哲学上の概念、たとえば「本質」や「実体」という概念に疑いの眼を向けます。というのも、それらの概念はほとんど別の言葉について語る空虚な言葉になりやすいからです。経験論者は抽象概念を経験から得られたデータに結びつけることを好みます。プラグマティズムを世に問うた思想家たちは、一八五九年に『種の起源』が出版された直後からダーウィンの進化論すなわち自然選択説を受け入れていました。その思想家たちの経験論が、ダーウィンの学説によって切り開かれた道を進んでゆき、そしてできたものがプラグマティズムだったのです。プラグマティズムの思想家にとって抽象概念の評価とは、世界と交わる私たちの試みに対するそれらの概念の寄与に鑑みてなされるべきものでした。

 この七十年のあいだ地球全体がかなり西洋化してきたとはいえ、生まれて三百年の哲学(経験論/プラグマティズム)が、千年を超える伝統によって培われてきたものに匹敵する深みに達することができるのかといえば、それはどうだろうかと私は思っています。つまり、この翻訳がなされたことを喜び、そして畏まりながらも、この訳書を読まれた方々が考えたことを知りたいと思っております。願わくは、本書がもつ限界を暖かい気持ちでお許しいただけますことを。

  本書の要点を一つ述べようと思います。それは言語と文化の壁を越えるという、本書の試みの助けとなるかもしれません。本書で扱っていることを説明するために、私が不完全共同体モデルと名づけたものを、ジェロム・ウェイクフィールドの有害な機能不全モデルと比べてみましょう。

 ウェイクフィールドによれば、精神疾患は自然選択に由来する通常の心理学的機能の破綻をまず含みます。そしてこの破綻に、その持ち主にとって有害であるという特徴が加わったものが精神疾患です。ウェイクフィールドのモデルは、ほとんどの人が精神疾患という概念によって意味していることを、さらには意味すべきことを明確にするモデルとして十分なものです。しかし、ウェイクフィールドのモデルはある特殊な問題、すなわち、本物の精神疾患と精神疾患以外の(ときとして)有害な心理状態とをいかにして線引きするかという問題に答えるために構成されたものでもありました。ウェイクフィールドは線引き問題に対して概念的な解決法を採用し、それを精神疾患全体についての理論へと一般化したのです。

 精神疾患の本性に対する私のアプローチは異なります。目に映るものの背後において、世界があれかこれかと選択できるような複数のカテゴリーに、たとえば身体疾患と精神疾患、疾患と健康、正常と異常というカテゴリーに組織化されていると仮定するのではなく、「そこにあるもの」についての経験から始めるのです。「そこ」でわかることですが、健康と疾患、正常と異常とのあいだの区別は極端な事例を考えればほぼ明らかです。しかし極端な事例に基づく区別は多くの目的にとって不適切です。

 近年の著作では、この状況を哲学でいう堆積物のパラドクスになぞらえてきました。説明しましょう。床に散らばった砂と砂山との違いは明らかです。しかし床に散らばった砂に、一粒また一粒と砂粒を加えていった場合、もう一粒だけ砂粒を加えれば床に散らばっていた砂が砂山になるという境目はどこにもありません。境界的な領域があって、そこでは散らばった砂と砂山との精確な区別ができないのです。事例によっては、このことが精神医学における正常と異常との区別にあてはまります。その区別を完璧に行なうことはできないのです。

 私たちの多くは、経験の複雑さを超越して、ヒステリーや自己愛性パーソナリティ、死別反応に関連する抑うつのような事物が本当に疾患なのか否かを明確に決定できるようにしてくれる答えを求めています。しかしながら、疑似的に精確な区別を本来的に不精確なものごとに押しつけるのであれば、それは自分や他人を欺くことになるでしょう。なにが成人であるのかを考えた場合、その答えは分類の目的によって変わることがあります(たとえば、成人であると分類したときに、許可されるものが飲酒なのか、選挙での投票なのか、卒業なのかによって)。まさにそれと同じく、なにを精神科疾患と考えるのかということも分類の目的によって変わることがあります。けれどもそうした変動は、疾患とは作りだされたものにすぎないということや、私たちが物事を欲しいままに定めることができるということを意味するものではありません。

 「そこ」で私たちはもう一つのことを目にします。それは、精神科疾患が様々な状態からなる雑多な集まりであるということです。それらの状態は、それぞれある観点では似通っており、別の観点では異なるものですが、この点では精神科疾患の全てが似通っているといえる観点はありません。精神科疾患は不完全共同体であり、それがまとまりをなしているのは全ての精神科疾患に共通する内的本性の発見によるものではなく、精神医学の領域に含まれる様々な状態を扱うために、精神医学者と心理学者がもつ一群のスキルが適しているからなのです。

 このように状況は複雑ですが、だからといって、メンタルヘルスの専門家は症状のクラスターを整合性のある種別にグループ分けするのを止めるべきだというわけではありません。抽象的な種別概念は、まさに実践的な事物でありえます。しかし、抽象概念は本性において、臨床上の実在がもつ多くの特殊な事柄を余すところなく捉えるものではないということは、ふまえておくべきでしょう。

 この「そこにあるもの」という見方が理にかなって妥当なものであるならば、私が記したことの一部は言語と文化の壁を越えてゆけるだろうという望みを、いささかなりとも私は抱いています。

 ピーター・ザッカー
2018年5月20日(植野仙経訳)